First case of monkeypox confirmed in Wisconsin

IT IS IN LAKE COUNTY CONFIRMED THAT IS DEFINITELY A CONCERN MONKEYPOX IS NOW CONFIRMED ON THE ILLINOIS BORDER WITH WISCONSIN. WE ARE IN THIS POSITION RIGHT NOW WHERE WE ARE TRYING TO FIND THE CASES SO THAT WE CAN IDENTIFY, TEST AND TREAT THEM SO THAT WE DON’T END UP WITH A GREATER SPREAD FASTER IN LAKE COUNTY, THE DEPARTMENT REPORTED OF ILLINOIS HEALTH HIS FIRST PROBABLE CASE OF VIRUS WEDNESDAY IN WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS LAKE COUNTY BORDERS SOUTHEAST, WISCONSIN AND WHILE THERE ARE NO CONFIRMED CASES IN BADGER STATE, ILLINOIS RANKS THE THIRD HIGHEST CASE NUMBER IN THE COUNTRY WITH 46 DOCTORS CONFIRMED BY UW INFECTIOUS HEALTH, DAN SHIRLEY SAID LAKE COUNTY AND WISCONSIN RESIDENTS REMAIN AT LOW RISK AT THIS TIME. HE SAYS IT IS MOST IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE KNOW THE SYMPTOMS AND REPORT THEM TO THEIR DOCTOR IF THEY THINK THEY HAVE IT OR ARE IN CLOSE CONTACT WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS SAID THE SYMPTOMS USUALLY START WITH A HEADACHE AND FATIGUE AFTER A FEW DAYS. GET A RASH THAT IS REALLY LIKE SMALL SKIN DAMAGES. IT MIGHT LOOK LIKE LAKE COUNTY RESIDENT BUTTONS OR BULBS. I KNOW I DON’T WANT TO GET IT. I WANT TO STAY AWAY FROM IT. ALWAYS WANT TO REMAIN VIGILANT. I CERTAINLY DON’T WANT TO RETURN TO A PANDEMIC, BUT DOCTORS POINT OUT THAT THE WAY IT SPREADS IS DIFFERENT THAN COVID AND OTHER VIRUSES. THIS IS NOT FULLY THE SAME WHAT WE’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT FOR A FEW YEARS WITH COVID. YOU REALLY NEED A LONG OR VERY CLOSE KIND OF CONTACT WITH SOMEONE WITH MONKEYPOX DURING THIS KIND OF ACUTE PHASE TO GET MONKEYPOX. SO COURTNEY, WHAT ARE THE PREVENTION OPTIONS FOR PEOPLE EXPOSED TO MONKEYPOX JOYCE THE SMALLPOX VACCINE IS ACTUALLY THE SAME VACCINE USED TO TREAT MONKEYPOX AND THERE IS A STOCK OF IT IN THE UNITED STATES. HOWEVER, THE ONLY PEOPLE WITH ACCESS AT THIS TIME ARE THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN CONFIRMED CLOSE CONTACT FROM SOMEONE WHO HAS MONKEYPOX SAYS COURTNEY LIVE REPORTING MEANWHILE THE US CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION HAS OPENED A

First case of monkeypox confirmed in Wisconsin

The Department of Health Services says the case is a Dane County person.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced that it has identified the first confirmed case of monkeypox, otherwise known as orthopoxvirus, in a Dane County resident. They added that the case was identified on June 30, the patient is currently in isolation and the risk remains low for the general public. There have been 396 confirmed cases of monkeypox and orthopoxvirus in the United States due to this outbreak. “The number of monkeypox cases continues to rise in the United States, so it’s no surprise that monkeypox has now been detected in Wisconsin,” Chief Medical Officer Dr. Ryan Westergaard said in a statement. Press. “While it is likely that additional cases will be discovered among Wisconsin residents, we are relieved that this disease does not spread easily from person to person. We would like all clinicians to remain alert to patients presenting with compatible rashes and encourage them to test for monkeypox. We want the public to know that the risk of widespread transmission remains low.” DHS has declared monkeypox a rare but potentially serious illness caused by the monkeypox virus . It is usually characterized by a new rash and unexplained skin lesions. Other early symptoms of monkeypox include fever, chills, and swollen lymph nodes. Recently identified cases have developed skin lesions in the genital, inguinal and anal regions that could be mistaken for rashes caused by common diseases such as herpes and syphilis. Most people with monkeypox recover in two to four weeks without needing treatment. However, vaccines and antiviral drugs can be used to prevent and treat monkeypox. The Department of Health Services adds that monkeypox is not easily transmitted from person to person. The virus is transmitted through respiratory droplets, sustained skin-to-skin contact, and contact with objects that have been contaminated by the fluids or wounds of someone with monkeypox. To prevent the spread of monkeypox, DHS encourages all Wisconsin residents to be aware of the following: Know the symptoms and risk factors for monkeypox. Avoid skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash or broken skin. Do not touch the rash or scabs, and do not kiss, hug, have sex, or share objects such as cooking utensils or bedding with anyone affected by monkeypox. In jurisdictions where the spread of monkeypox is known, participating in activities with skin-to-skin contact may pose a higher risk of exposure. If you have recently been exposed to the virus, contact a doctor or nurse to find out if you need a vaccine to prevent illness. Monitor your health for fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, and a new unexplained rash, and contact a healthcare provider if any of these occur. If you become ill, avoid contact with others until you receive health care. State health experts say they are in a much better position with this than they were with COVID-19 because they know a lot about the virus, and they have vaccines and treatments available for the people who need it. Wisconsin’s last outbreak was in 2003. At that time, health officials reported 39 cases in the state.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced that it has identified the first confirmed case of monkeypox, otherwise known as orthopoxvirus, in a Dane County resident.

They added that the case was identified on June 30, the patient is currently in isolation and the risk remains low for the general public.

There have been 396 confirmed cases of monkeypox and orthopoxvirus in the United States due to this outbreak.

“The number of monkeypox cases continues to rise in the United States, so it’s no surprise that monkeypox has now been detected in Wisconsin,” Chief Medical Officer Dr. Ryan Westergaard said in a statement. Press. “While it is likely that additional cases will be discovered among Wisconsin residents, we are relieved that this disease does not spread easily from person to person. We would like all clinicians to remain alert to patients presenting with compatible rashes and encourage them to test for monkeypox. . We want the public to know that the risk of widespread transmission remains low.”

The DHS has declared monkeypox to be a rare but potentially serious illness caused by the monkeypox virus.

It is usually characterized by a new rash and unexplained skin lesions. Other early symptoms of monkeypox include fever, chills, and swollen lymph nodes. Recently identified cases have developed skin lesions in the genital, inguinal and anal regions that could be mistaken for rashes caused by common diseases such as herpes and syphilis.

Most people with monkeypox recover in two to four weeks without needing treatment. However, vaccines and antiviral drugs can be used to prevent and treat monkeypox.

The Department of Health Services adds that monkeypox is not easily transmitted from person to person. The virus is transmitted through respiratory droplets, sustained skin-to-skin contact, and contact with objects that have been contaminated by the fluids or wounds of someone with monkeypox.

To prevent the spread of monkeypox, DHS encourages all Wisconsin residents to be aware of the following:

  • Know the symptoms and risk factors of monkeypox.
  • Avoid skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash or skin lesions. Do not touch the rash or scabs, and do not kiss, hug, hug, have sex, or share objects such as cooking utensils or bedding with someone with monkeypox.
  • In jurisdictions where the spread of monkeypox is known, participation in activities with close, personal, and skin-to-skin contact may present a higher risk of exposure.
  • If you have recently been exposed to the virus, contact a doctor or nurse to find out if you need a vaccine to prevent illness. Monitor your health for fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, and a new unexplained rash, and contact a healthcare provider if any of these occur. If you become ill, avoid contact with others until you receive health care.

State health experts say they are in a much better position with this than they were with COVID-19 because they know a lot about the virus and they have vaccines and treatments available to those who need them.

Wisconsin’s last outbreak was in 2003. At that time, health officials reported 39 cases in the state.

#case #monkeypox #confirmed #Wisconsin

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