Male dogs are more likely to develop cancer because they spend more time sniffing other puppies’ genitals

Male dogs are FOUR TIMES more likely to develop nose or mouth cancer because they spend more time sniffing and licking other puppies’ genitals than female dogs, study finds

  • Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a contagious form of cancer
  • It spreads between dogs when they come into contact with an infected dog
  • Researchers analyzed nearly 2,000 cases from around the world
  • Findings show nose or mouth tumors are much more common in men

Most dog owners won’t blink when their pet sniffs another dog’s rear end.

But a new study has warned that common behavior may increase the risk of an unusual cancer, called canine transmissible venereal tumour.

Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a contagious form of cancer that is spread between dogs when they come into contact.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge have now revealed that male dogs are four times more likely to develop CTVT because they spend more time sniffing and licking other dogs’ genitals than females.

The cancer usually causes tumors on the external genitalia of both male and female dogs, but can also affect other areas like the nose, mouth and skin (pictured).

What is CTTV?

Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a contagious form of cancer that is spread between dogs when they come into contact.

CTVT is transmitted by the transfer of live cancer cells between dogs, usually during mating.

The cancer typically causes tumors on the external genitalia of both male and female dogs, but can also affect other areas like the nose, mouth, and skin.

CTVT, also known as transmissible venereal tumor or Sticker’s sarcoma, is a transmissible cancer that affects dogs.

“CTVT is spread by the transfer of live cancer cells between dogs, usually during mating,” the University of Cambridge explains on its website.

Although the cancer is not common in the UK, the number of cases has increased over the past decade, researchers say – likely linked to the importation of dogs from overseas.

“Although canine transmissible cancer can be diagnosed and treated fairly easily, UK vets may not know the signs of the disease as it is very rare here,” said Dr Andrea Strakova, who led the study. .

The cancer typically causes tumors on the external genitalia of both male and female dogs, but can also affect other areas like the nose, mouth, and skin.

In the study, the team sought to understand how cases vary between male and female dogs, examining nearly 2,000 cases of CTVT from around the world.

Their review revealed that only 32 CTVT tumors affected the nose or mouth. Of these, 27 cases were found in male dogs.

Dr Strakova said: ‘We found that a very large proportion of canine transmissible cancer nose or mouth tumors were in male dogs.

“We believe this is because male dogs may have a preference for sniffing or licking female genitalia, versus the reverse.

“Female genital tumors may also be more accessible for sniffing and licking, compared to male genital tumors.”

Most dog owners won't blink when their pet sniffs another dog's rear end.  But a new study has warned of how common behavior can increase the risk of an unusual cancer, called canine transmissible venereal tumor (stock image)

Most dog owners won’t blink when their pet sniffs another dog’s rear end. But a new study has warned of how common behavior can increase the risk of an unusual cancer, called canine transmissible venereal tumor (stock image)

CTVT, also known as transmissible venereal tumor or Sticker's sarcoma, is a transmissible cancer that affects dogs.  It is transmitted by the transfer of living cancer cells between dogs, usually during mating.

CTVT, also known as transmissible venereal tumor or Sticker’s sarcoma, is a transmissible cancer that affects dogs. It is transmitted by the transfer of living cancer cells between dogs, usually during mating.

The researchers hope the results will encourage veterinarians to consider CTVT as a possible diagnosis for tumors of the nose or mouth.

“We believe it is important to consider CTVT as a possible diagnosis of oronasal tumors in dogs,” Dr. Strakova added.

“Treatment is very effective, using single-agent Vincristine chemotherapy, and the vast majority of dogs recover.”

Transmissible cancers are also present in Tasmanian devils and in marine bivalves such as mussels and clams.

The researchers hope that studying these unusual, long-lived cancers could also be useful in understanding how human cancers work.

WHAT ARE THE TEN COMMON MYTHS ABOUT DOGS?

It’s easy to believe that dogs like what we like, but that’s not always strictly true.

Here are ten things people should remember when trying to understand their pets, according to animal behavior experts Dr Melissa Starling and Dr Paul McGreevy, from the University of Sydney.

1. Dogs don’t like to share

2. Not all dogs like to be hugged or petted.

3. A barking dog is not always an aggressive dog.

4. Dogs don’t like other dogs entering their territory/house

5. Dogs like to be active and don’t need as much relaxation time as humans.

6. Not all dogs are overly friendly, some are more shy to begin with

7. A dog that seems friendly can quickly become aggressive.

8. Dogs need open spaces and new areas to explore. Playing in the garden won’t always be enough

9. Sometimes a dog doesn’t misbehave, he just doesn’t understand what to do or what you want.

10. Subtle facial signals often prevent barking or snapping when a dog is upset

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